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Technology

Samsung Gear VR App Relúmino Helps The Visually Impaired

Samsung Gear VR App Relúmino Helps The Visually Impaired
2 min read

You're reading Entrepreneur Middle East, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

From watching medical operations in real-time, to soothing patients with alternative environments, and even helping patients to recover from a stroke or a traumatic brain injury, there are a lot of potential applications for virtual reality in healthcare. Samsung is now entering this market- fresh from the tech company’s in-house ideas incubator C-Lab Space is Relúmino, an application for Gear VR that aims to help people with visual impairment. Available in the Oculus Store, users can download the free app with a verification code and sync with Galaxy smartphones.

Source: Samsung Relumino

Relúmino, which means “light up again” in Latin, boasts a number of nifty features: it can magnify and minimize images, highlights an image's outline, adjusts color contrast and brightness, invert colors and screen color filters. Whether reading or viewing an object, the app lets visually challenged people see images clearer. Another cool factor? For those with impaired peripheral vision, or as more commonly known, tunnel vision, when Relúmino is set for tunnel vision mode, it automatically places the blind point for users within the visible range.

Source: Samsung Relumino

Though C-Lab projects usually have around a year before its closure or its launch as a standalone company, Samsung plans for the visual aid app to function as is, and develop related products. Given the appearance of VR headsets today (which make it unfit for regular use), the company now aims to develop “glasses-like products” as visuals aids for everyday use- now that's something to look out for. Stay tuned!

Related: Microsoft To Make VR Work On Low-End Devices With FlashBack

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