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The Harvey Weinstein Scandal Is a Clarion Call to Men In Positions of Leadership Men are disproportionately in positions of leadership. They have a special obligation to battle sexual harassment.

By Jonathan Segal Edited by Dan Bova

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Paul Bruinooge | Patrick McMullan | Getty Images

But again we have been rocked by explosive allegations of sexual harassment and sexual assault. In the case of Harvey Weinstein, there are now more than 30 women who have stepped forward. Weinstein admits to bad behavior but claims it was all consensual. From what I have read, this is not a good defense, even for a science fiction movie.

Weinstein is far from the only predator in Hollywood, and Hollywood is just a symptom of the problem. The casting couch can affect who gets plum assignments, leads, contacts, etc. in any industry. Few men with power would ever consider, let alone engage in, the kind of conduct engaged in by Weinstein and others but they must do more than just refrain from the indefensible. With power, men have the opportunity, indeed the obligation, to create cultures where harassment does not flourish. So what do we do?

Related: Uber Fires More Than 20 Employees for Harassment

1. Stand up in the moment.

You don't need to have a daughter to stand up. You just need a conscience and a spine. So speak up if you see or hear bad behavior. To be silent is to condone. Yes, the worst behaviors are very often private but sometimes they are accompanied by less serious but still bad public behavior. For example, don't laugh at the sexist jokes. Instead, make clear they are offensive to you and then take corrective action.

The less serious public behaviors may be but the tip of the iceberg. Where appropriate, engage a third party to see if there is more than meets the eye. Climate surveys by skilled professionals can uncover what has not been reported without creating claims where none may exist.

Related: 5 Ways to Manage 'Mad Men'-Era Sexual Harassment

2. Don't wait for the direct complaint.

The victims of harassment frequently are embarassed or feel unwarranted shame. Some women won't vocalize their discomfort but instead avoid the harasser or become uncomfortable when his name is mentioned. Observe closely for, and listen carefully to, signals that something may be wrong.

There won't always be signals. But where there are warning signs, think about how to offer your help in a way that respects the recipient and does not create an issue where there may not be one. This can and has been done successfully.

Related: 5 Steps Women Can Take to Fight Sexual Harassment At Workplace

3. Create additional reporting vehicles.

Fear of retaliation is a great inhibitor of timely reporting. So you may want to take a look at your company's policies and at least consider having a procedure by which employees can report complaints externally, even anonymously.

Not every complaint is true and that applies to anonymous complaints, too. But every complaint should be taken seriously, and I have been involved in matters where the ability to report externally and anonymously has led to the facts that resulted in the unmasking of a serial harasser. So consider the option.

Related: Female Engineer Sues Tesla Over Sexist Culture

4. Hold other leaders accountable.

Harassers sometimes generate big bucks and that is why individuals sometimes cover up for, and even truckle up to, them. You need to cross their bridge to get meaningful work and the money that goes with it. Make clear to other leaders that you expect them not only to refrain from harassing behavior (severe or subtle) but also to report to a designated person or entity complaints or potential problems which they see, hear or of which they otherwise become aware. Ostriches don't make good leaders.

As with all expectations, reward those who live up to them and punish those who don't. Your organization is only as strong as its reputation and it can be destroyed if leaders are passive bystanders.

Related: A Female Employee Reportedly Called Tesla's Factory a 'Predator Zone' at a Meeting Where Some Workers Described Sexual Harassment

5. Model what you expect.

Most of all, men in power need to be good role models. There is nothing cool about demeaning women. The abuse is both powerful and pathetic. There is no defense to the indefensible. Sexual addiction is no more a defense to harassment than alcoholism is to driving drunk.

Speaking of alcohol, it is a major risk factor. Some cultures celebrate alcohol and such alcohol-centric cultures take away any slim inhibitors that otherwise might exist. Bottom line: it's on men. Any questions, pal?

Jonathan Segal

Partner in Employment Practice Group of Duane Morris

Jonathan A. Segal is a partner in the employment practice group of Duane Morris LLP in Philadelphia and principal at the Duane Morris Institute, an educational organization.

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