Transform Your Day With This 10-Minute Routine When You First Arrive at the Office Here's how focusing on the present before moving into the day's goals can change your outlook.

By Hayden Field

entrepreneur daily
Hero Images | Getty Images

The phrase "daily grind" -- meaning a repetitive, tiresome work routine -- may have originated in the mid-1800s, but it's just as relevant today. Just 33 percent of U.S. workers are engaged in their jobs, according to a 2017 Gallup report -- and just four in 10 employees strongly agree that they've had opportunities to learn and grow in the past year.

If your days feel monotonous and this hits home, one key to turning things around might lie in the first 10 minutes of your work day. As soon as you sit down at your desk, you can practice mindfulness -- or focusing on the present -- and then move into your goals for the day.

Before you even open your inbox, close your eyes and check in with yourself, says Lodro Rinzler, co-founder of MNDFL meditation studios. Focus on the weight of your body in your chair and your feet on the ground, then take three slow, deep breaths -- in through the nose and out through the mouth.

Once you feel calm and centered, think about your big-picture goals for the day. "Ask yourself: What qualities do I want to cultivate today? Who do I want to be? How do I want to show up for my workplace today?" Rinzler says. "Whatever we place our attention on ultimately grows throughout the course of the day."

Next, try moving onto more concrete task goals. Write down what you'd like to accomplish today, but try not to overload yourself -- and list your tasks in order of urgency. If a traditional list feels too run-of-the-mill -- or you feel overwhelmed with work -- try drawing a grid and designating your to-dos via the "Eisenhower Matrix," a task organizer inspired by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

While you're at it, set a quiet timer or calendar alert for every 30 or 60 minutes. Whenever you're pinged during the day, turn your eyes away from your screen for at least a minute. That can look like taking a quick walk around the room or simply focusing on your surroundings -- just give your eyes a break. Doing this can help you make your energy last and avoid feeling drained at day's end.

Related: Low on Motivation? 7 Psychological Hacks to Get Going

Hayden Field

Entrepreneur Staff

Associate Editor

Hayden Field is an associate editor at Entrepreneur. She covers technology, business and science. Her work has also appeared in Fortune Magazine, Mashable, Refinery29 and others. 

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

Editor's Pick

Related Topics

Science & Technology

The 'Mother of All Breaches' Just Happened — Here's the Security Implications for Businesses

If your business exists online, chances are some percent of your customers' data got leaked in what cybersecurity specialists boldly labeled as the "mother of all breaches" (MOAB).

Side Hustle

Getting Laid Off Allowed Him to Focus on His Sentimental Side Hustle. Now He's on Track to Earn Over $700,000 in 2024.

Alaa El Ghatit wasn't fulfilled at his day job. So he started LifeOnRecord to help people record memories and well wishes.

Business News

The Owner of a Popular Boston Restaurant Is Under Fire After Direct Messaging, Berating a Customer Who Disputed $250 Cancelation Fee

New York-based traveler Trevor Chauvin-DeCaro was set to dine at Table in Boston's North End last month.

Business News

Klarna Says Its AI Assistant Does the Work of 700 People. The Company Laid Off the Same Number of Employees 2 Years Ago.

The AI bot has taken on 75% of Klarna's customer service chats, or about 2.3 million conversations, within a month of launch.

Business Ideas

55 Small Business Ideas to Start in 2024

We put together a list of the best, most profitable small business ideas for entrepreneurs to pursue in 2024.