A Sprinkle of Architecture Made Coolhaus an Ice Cream Powerhouse Here's why inspiring joy is the secret ingredient to the company's success.

By Kristen Aldridge

entrepreneur daily

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

At first glance, architecture and ice cream may not seem like a natural pairing, but for Coolhaus co-founder and CEO Natasha Case, the combination couldn't be sweeter.

With a background in architectural studies and a passion for making models out of food, Case saw an opportunity to innovate the dessert world and build an ice cream brand for millennials. In 2009, Case and co-founder Freya Estreller dove headfirst into the sweet life with the first-ever food truck at Coachella.

Over a decade later, business is booming for the women-founded brand. Coolhaus can be found in over 7,500 stores across the country, and its mobile ice cream trucks, where its "architects" whip up custom ice cream sandwiches in flavors like Horchata and Snickerdoodle, are a staple at parties and events.

Case and Estreller even released a recipe book, which highlights architects alongside shots of signature flavor combinations like BuckMINTster Fuller, which melds mint chocolate chip ice cream with chocolate chip cookies.

For Case, the joy that ice cream inspires is what motivates her. Her mission is to infuse the Coolhaus culture with this same spirit and continue creating an innovative experience for customers.

"When you bring something to people that gives them that joy, it gives it back to you," Case says. "It's like this endless cycle of good energy."

In this episode of How Brands Are Born, get the scoop on Case's journey from architecture student to ice cream maven.

How Brands Are Born is presented by Cardone Ventures, in partnership with Original Stories Media. Learn how Grant Cardone and Brandon Dawson can help your business transform and scale to 10X levels HERE.

Kristen Aldridge

Founder of Original Stories Media, Journalist, Producer and Storyteller

Emmy-winning journalist and brand storytelling expert Kristen Aldridge is founder and CEO of Original Stories Media, a production company that specializes in capturing the origin stories behind the world’s most impactful brands. With over two decades of experience in the media industry, she has created content garnering millions of views for hugely successful platforms including Entrepreneur, ESPN, ABC, CBS, Yahoo!, and SHAPE.

Passionate about all things entrepreneurship, Aldridge created the original digital series How Brands Are Born to shine a light on all the remarkable people changing the world one big, bold dream at a time. Her mission is to help leaders reveal their most authentic selves so they can more effectively unleash their vision, inspire their culture, and bring deep value to the marketplace.

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