You can be on Entrepreneur’s cover!

In Push For T-Mobile Takeover, Sprint Owner Calls U.S. Broadband Sluggish, Overpriced Sprint owner Masayoshi Son -- the richest man in Japan -- is lately making the press rounds in America to hype a potential acquisition of T-Mobile.

By Geoff Weiss

entrepreneur daily

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Facing an uphill battle against regulators likely to rebuff a merger between the nation's third and fourth largest cell phone carriers, the Japanese billionaire who owns Sprint is making a full-court press.

Speaking at the United States Chamber of Commerce yesterday, Masayoshi Son insisted that the acquisition of T-Mobile by Sprint would ultimately improve America's wireless broadband network, which he called sluggish and overpriced.

The evening prior, in an interview with Charlie Rose, Son vowed to instigate a "massive price war" among wireless providers if indeed the acquisition were to go through.

While the government might prevent a merger on antitrust grounds, Son called the existing duopoly by AT&T and Verizon a "pseudo-competition."

Related: Make Your Own Luck and Get Acquired

AT&T and Verizon count 110 and 103 million subscribers, respectively. Languishing far behind, Sprint and T-Mobile tally about half as many customers -- 54 million and 47 million, respectively.

Son is the chairman of SoftBank, a Japanese telecommunications conglomerate that purchased a majority stake in Sprint last year for a reported $21.6 billion.

According to The New York Times, his address to the Chamber of Commerce featured patriotic slides touting the American flag, as well as numerous references to his own professional accomplishments.

Related: Leaked T-Mobile Memo Reveals BlackBerry Loyalists Are Jumping Ship

As the richest man in Japan, Son reportedly noted that, before the dot-com bubble burst, "I was richer than Bill Gates for three days."

"We can start a small fight but it does not scale," Son said of Sprint's relatively diminutive reach. "We need to have a real fight -- a long and deep and heavy fight. And for that we need scale."

But scale hasn't stopped T-Mobile from provoking some skirmishes of its own. After dubbing itself the "un-carrier," the company offered in January to pay the early-termination fees of AT&T, Verizon and Sprint customers who quit their contracts to join the T-Mobile network.

This isn't the first time that a competing carrier has made a bid to snap up T-Mobile. In 2011, AT&T was blocked from taking over the company by the Antitrust Division of the United States Department of Justice.

Related: After Snapping Up Sprint, SoftBank Sets Sights on T-Mobile

Geoff Weiss

Former Staff Writer

Geoff Weiss is a former staff writer at Entrepreneur.com.

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

Side Hustle

This Dad Started a Side Hustle to Save for His Daughter's College Fund — Then It Earned $1 Million and Caught Apple's Attention

In 2015, Greg Kerr, now owner of Alchemy Merch, was working as musician when he noticed a lucrative opportunity.

Business News

I Designed My Dream Home For Free With an AI Architect — Here's How It Works

The AI architect, Vitruvius, created three designs in minutes, complete with floor plans and pictures of the inside and outside of the house.

Growing a Business

Bantam Bagels' Founder Fell Into a Mindset Trap 'People Don't Talk About' After Selling the Now-Defunct Business for $34 Million — Here's What Happened

Elyse Oleksak and her husband Nick founded their mini bagel business in 2013 — and it was an instant hit.

Business Solutions

Get an Extra 20% Off the Price of Microsoft Office for Mac or Windows Through April 16

Boost your productivity with special pricing on these proven products.

Business News

X Is Suddenly Prohibiting Users From Hiding Their Blue Checkmarks

Earlier this month, X gave blue checkmarks to accounts with over 2,500 verified users — regardless of whether or not they opted in.

Management

The Best Communicators Follow These 3 Rules When Talking to Those in Authority

Here's to turn a communication mishap into a powerful communication framework.When you are clear about the kind of communication you need, it's easier for people to say the right things and take the right actions.