Ending Soon! Save 33% on All Access

Former Google Exec: 'Don't Be Evil' Motto Is Dead Ross LaJeunesse, Google's former head of international relations, published a scathing 2,175-word blog post about his former employer.

By Michael Kan

This story originally appeared on PCMag

NurPhoto | Getty Images

Google is facing criticism from a former company executive, who claims the tech giant prioritizes profits over human rights.

"The company's motto used to be 'Don't be evil.' Things have changed," Ross LaJeunesse, Google's former head of international relations, who left the company last year, wrote in a scathing 2,175-word blog post published today.

Related: How Google's Youngest-Ever Hire Launched an AI Company Backed by Mark Cuban (Podcast)

LaJeunesse pointed to Google's Project Dragonfly, a now-abandoned effort to re-enter the Chinese market with a censored search engine, which reportedly would've allowed Chinese authorities to track users' search history. It axed Dragonfly after pushback from lawmakers and employees, but LaJeunesse claims the episode is evidence of Google's "Greed and abuse of power."

LaJeunesse, who joined Google in 2008, said he tried to push the company to formally adopt a program whereby all product design elements wound undergo a review to examine their impact on human rights. "But each time I recommended a Human Rights Program, senior executives came up with an excuse to say no," he claimed.

According to LaJeunesse, the justifications included fear of legal liabilities and wanting to keep the issue solely within the oversight of individual product teams. But he argues Google essentially "sidelined" him from the Dragonfly project.

"I then realized that the company had never intended to incorporate human rights principles into its business and product decisions," he added. "Just when Google needed to double down on a commitment to human rights, it decided to instead chase bigger profits and an even higher stock price."

Related: Google Is Adding Spam Detection and Verified Business SMS to Messages

LaJeunesse also claims Google has a toxic workplace culture, citing some cringeworthy examples: "Senior colleagues bullied and screamed at young women, causing them to cry at their desks. At an all-hands meeting, my boss said, 'Now you Asians come to the microphone too. I know you don't like to ask questions,'" he claimed.

In November 2018, thousands of company workers held a walkout over the same issue.

LaJeunesse is now running in the Democratic primary for US Senate in Maine; the winner will go up against long-time Republican Sen. Susan Collins. So today's blog post may give him a publicity boost, while also answering questions about his work at Google. If elected to office, LaJeunesse indicates he'll try to regulate today's largest tech companies.

Michael Kan

Reporter

Michael has been a PCMag reporter since October 2017. He previously covered tech news in China from 2010 to 2015, before moving to San Francisco to write about cybersecurity.

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

Business News

TikTok Reportedly Laid Off a 'Large Percentage' of Employees as the App's Fate in the U.S. Remains Unclear

Laid-off TikTok employees were notified Wednesday night through Thursday morning.

Business News

More People Are Exploring Entrepreneurship Because of This Unexpected Reason

More new business applications were filed in 2023 than in any other year so far.

Business News

Four Seasons Orlando Responds to Viral TikTok: 'There's Something Here For All Ages'

The video has amassed over 45.4 million views on TikTok.

Business Ideas

63 Small Business Ideas to Start in 2024

We put together a list of the best, most profitable small business ideas for entrepreneurs to pursue in 2024.

Leadership

8 Subtle Hints that People Don't Respect You — and How to Fix Them

While you have to earn respect, you don't have to deal with disrespect in the meantime.