Chobani Can't Be Marketed as 'Greek Yogurt' in the U.K.

A British court ruled that Chobani can't call their product 'Greek yogurt' because it is made in the U.S.

learn more about Kate Taylor

By Kate Taylor

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

A British court ruled that New York-headquartered Greek yogurt company Chobani cannot label its products "Greek yogurt" in the U.K. The reason? Its yogurt is made in the U.S.

While Italian dressing and French fries have long been accepted as worldwide commodities despite their names, Greek yogurt is new on the scene, and some companies would like to keep it in the country – at least in terms of production. Fage, a Greek company and one of Chobani's competitors, argued in the case that the "Greek yogurt" label misled customers to believe the product had been made in Greece. The reality is that Greek yogurt differs from regular yogurt only in the number of times it is strained during the production process.

While the British court agreed with Fage, Chobani remains unwilling to give up the fight. The company plans to appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

Related: Chobani's Secret to Making Customers Feel Like Family

Chobani launched in 2007 and has quickly become the top seller of Greek yogurt in the U.S. In 2012, the company launched their products in the U.K., where Fage has reigned as the leading Greek yogurt brand.

"We remain of the view that the population of the U.K. know and understand Greek yogurt to be a product description regardless of where it is made," Chobani said in a statement. "We remain committed to the U.K. market and to breaking the monopoly on the use of the term Greek yogurt enjoyed by Fage."

While Chobani played a huge role in Greek yogurt's rise in the U.S., recent months have been hard on the chain. A redesign sparked controversy, as the company's yogurt containers shrank to 5.3 ounces from 6 ounces, while remaining the same price. This past December, Whole Foods pulled Chobani from their shelves due in part to concern over genetically modified ingredients.

Related: Chobani Yogurt's Success Starts Where a Giant Left Off

Kate Taylor

Reporter

Kate Taylor is a reporter at Business Insider. She was previously a reporter at Entrepreneur. Get in touch with tips and feedback on Twitter at @Kate_H_Taylor. 

Related Topics

Editor's Pick

Have More Responsibilities at Work, But No Pay Bump? Use This Script to Get the Raise You Deserve.
Black and Asian Founders Face Opposition at All Levels — Here's Why That Has to Change
Business News

'This Made Me Physically Recoil From My Phone': Lingerie Brand Apologizes For 'Creepy' Ad Referencing Ryan Reynolds and Bras

Online lingerie retailer Harper Wilde is under fire for a bizarre sponsored post it has since pulled from Instagram.

Business News

Viral Sensation 'Popcorn Guy' Has Earned a Gig at the 2023 Oscars

Jason Grosboll first went viral on TikTok for his theatrical method of buttering popcorn in a Texas movie theater.

Thought Leaders

5 Small Daily Habits Self-Made Millionaires Use to Grow Their Wealth

We've all seen what self-made millionaires look like on TV, but it's a lot more subtle than that. Brian Tracy researched what small daily habits these successful entrepreneurs adopted on their journey from rags to riches.