Here's a Reminder: Laughter Makes Meetings Better Group rapport and camaraderie translates to innovation, creativity and new solutions.

By Nina Zipkin

entrepreneur daily

Were you the class clown in school? We're guessing it got you banished to the back of the class. But according to a recent study, cracking jokes in the office with your co-workers could help you get ahead in the office, as humor can actually make the workplace more productive.

The researchers behind the study, Nale Lehmann-Willenbrock, a professor of psychology at VU University Amsterdam and Joseph A. Allen, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Nebraska, took a look at several German companies. They recorded 54 "regular organizational team meetings" and then tracked them to find the patterns of jokes and laughter.

Related: 7 Personality Types That Can Make or Break Your Meeting

With those observations, along with performance reviews from the employee's managers after the meetings (as well as a later time), the professors found that "humor patterns triggered positive socioemotional communication, procedural structure, and new solutions." Meaning that what you thought was just kidding around and simple camaraderie could actually lead to more creativity and innovation in everyone's work. This improved team performance, both in the present time and two years later.

However, the researchers found that there were a couple of caveats. It wasn't just jokes or laughter that contributed to the positive reviews, but rather a group rapport that led to the humor patterns: joke, laughter, another joke. Additionally, when job security wasn't an issue, Lehmann-Willenbrock and Allen found that "humor patterns were positively related to performance but during times of higher job insecurity, humor played less of a role in in the team performance."

Related: 10 Ways to Engage Your Audience During an Important Meeting

Nina Zipkin

Entrepreneur Staff

Staff Writer. Covers leadership, media, technology and culture.

Nina Zipkin is a staff writer at Entrepreneur.com. She frequently covers leadership, media, tech, startups, culture and workplace trends.

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

Editor's Pick

Related Topics

Business News

Former Pediatrics Professor Donates $1 Billion, Makes Albert Einstein College of Medicine Tuition-Free

Dr. Ruth Gottesman's husband left her $1 billion in Berkshire Hathaway stock with the following instructions: "Do whatever you think is right with it."

Devices

Get a 15-inch MacBook Pro for Less Than $375

Save on this refurbished MacBook Pro for a limited time.

Business News

'Next Tesla' Electric Car Startups Hit Speed Bump: 'Investors Want To See Demand'

Electric vehicle companies large and small, from Ford to Tesla to Rivian, are dealing with cooler-than-expected demand for EVs.

Social Media

With This LinkedIn Algorithm Change, Your Best Posts Could Reach New Readers for Years

It's one of many new features rolling out on the platform in 2024.