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7 Financial Skills I Wished I Had Learned in High School Learn from my mistakes and start making good financial decisions early.

By Jeff Rose Edited by Dan Bova

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

In this video, Entrepreneur Network partner Jeff Rose discusses some of the essentials about money, budgeting and investing he wishes he would have learned in high school and thinks should be taught in schools today. For example, both of Rose's parents struggled with credit card debt, and Rose fell into a similar trap as he got older. If he knew better about credit cards and interest rates, he might have avoided that early struggle.

Or, if Rose knew more about how to improve your credit -- and how not to ruin it -- he might have had an easier time with loans at a younger age. If he knew better about the power of compounded interest, he might have invested more.

Click play to learn the lessons Rose wishes he knew in high school and skip over his frustrations.

Related: 7 Crucial Lessons I Learned While Starting My Business

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Jeff Rose

Certified Financial Planner, Author and Blogger

Jeff Rose is an entrepreneur disguised as a certified financial planner, author and blogger.  He's best know for his blog GoodFinancialCents.com and book, Soldier of Finance: Take Charge of Your Money and Invest in Your Future.  He's also the editor of LifeInsurancebyJeff.com. He escaped a path of financial destruction from dropping out of college with over $20,000 of credit card debt to become a self-made millionaire. His mission is help future generations achieve financial freedom by developing strong money habits and unleashing their entrepreneurial spirit.   

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

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