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'Entrepreneur Elevator Pitch' Season 1 Contestants Raised $492,000 on Indiegogo Whether or not they got an investment on the show, these entrepreneurs succeeded with the crowd.

By Liz Webber

entrepreneur daily
Entrepreneur Media

In season 1 of Entrepreneur Elevator Pitch -- a pitch competition show where contestants have 60 seconds to present their ideas in an actual elevator -- founders gave it their all to reach the boardroom for a chance to convince a panel of investors to back their businesses. But for many, the fundraising journey didn't start or end in the elevator.

Elevator Pitch entrepreneurs also had the opportunity to list their ideas on crowdfunding site Indiegogo. In total, these ideas raised $492,000. Read on to see which ones raised the most.

Be sure to tune in for season 2 of Entrepreneur Elevator Pitch, premiering April 25.

Related: Season Two of 'Entrepreneur Elevator Pitch' Is on a Whole New Level

Wonderffle Stuffed Waffle Iron, $9,925

Though the judges were enticed by the Wonderffle Stuffed Waffle Iron on episode 8, they deemed it too early-stage for a major investment. Its run on Indiegogo brought in $9,925, 132 percent of the goal.

Hiipe, $10,371

Hiipe, a chat app that rewards users with points to redeem for raffles and discounts, didn't quite make it onto season 1 of Elevator Pitch. But, the founders were still invited to put the product up on Indiegogo, and they raised $10,371, 103 percent of their goal.

The Mood Factory, $10,389

Before appearing on episode 2, The Mood Factory's line of mood-enhancing products had already earned an impressive $9 million in sales. On Indiegogo, the company raised $10,389 for its Happiness Scent and 21-Day Course, 104 percent of its goal.

Related: 10 Top Crowdfunding Websites

Runway Heels, $11,230

Upon hearing the pitch for Runway Heels on episode 9, Elevator Pitch judge Dawn LaFreeda said, "They're perfect!" but the panel ultimately decided it was too early to invest. The product raised $11,230 on Indiegogo, 111 percent of the goal.

At Home Ovulation Double Check, $43,818

Amy Beckley secured a $200,000 investment from the judges in episode 3 to fund a new "hormone help monitor," an at-home fertility test. Previously, she raised $43,818 for her first product, the At Home Ovulation Double Check, 111 percent of her goal.

BatBnB, $107,638

Elevator Pitch judges were skeptical about the market for the BatBnB, but fans helped the eco-friendly bat house raise $107,638, about 344 percent of its fundraising goal. BatBnB was on episode 11 of the show.

Related: Live at CES: Indiegogo CEO Predicts What's Next for Crowdfunding

TouchPoints basic, $268,855

The product that raised the most money on Indiegogo, and exceeded its goal by the highest amount, was TouchPoints basic, a wearable device that promises to relieve stress and help you sleep better. Appearing in episode 12 of Elevator Pitch, where it got $400,000 from the judges, TouchPoints raised $268,855 on the crowdfunding site, 956 percent of its goal.

Liz Webber

Entrepreneur Staff

Insights Editor

Liz Webber is the insights editor at Enterpreneur.com, where she manages the contributor network.

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

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