How Women Entrepreneurs in This Rural Peru Community Work Together to Build a Stronger Business

To provide support for their entire community, these female founders must collaborate, rather than compete.
Contributor
Founder of This Dog's Life
2 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

We often hear about the mentality some American entrepreneurs feel they must possess to survive. It can be cutthroat, with many feeling they need to compete with one another in what is often a zero-sum game -- where there can only be one winner. 

But that approach isn’t always practical for growing industries and communities in the U.S. and beyond. Consider Peru, for example. The country as a whole is considered one of the fastest growing economies in the world, but in rural areas, the same can't be said. Many people don't have the resources, money or time to stay current on the latest technologies, trends and business models. Their focus is more on survival than getting rich. Which is why these local entrepreneurs must work together for the greater good rather than compete with each other.

Related: How to Build a Strong Community?

Earlier this year, we visited the village of Ccaccaccollo -- 15 miles from Cusco and 80 miles from  Macchu Picchu -- and met with a women’s co-op of 60 female entrepreneurs creating handmade goods for locals and tourists. While each woman creates her own products using traditional weaving methods, they collaborate to provide support for the 440 community members, including paying for roads, livestock and children's education.

Related: How Social Entrepreneurship Can Benefit Businesses and the Communities They Serve

We chatted with the women’s co-op leader, Francisca Qquerar Mayta, in this video for Women Entrepreneur to learn more about the community, what being a woman entrepreneur means and how their work is helping the next generation.

 

More From Women Entrepreneur

Small Businesses

These City Programs Are Giving Minority- and Women-Owned Businesses Access to Capital

If you're an entrepreneur in Minneapolis, Atlanta or New York, these programs could help fund your business idea.
Business Unusual

Ayesha Curry Has Built a Business Empire -- and She's Still Learning

The entrepreneur turned a YouTube channel into a lifestyle brand, including a book, restaurants, and TV gigs. Her guiding principle: Treat every step as an education.
Entrepreneurs

How the Founder of Schmidt's Naturals Went From Zero to a Nine-Figure Exit

Jaime Schmidt started selling natural deodorant at farmer's markets in 2010. By 2017, she sold her company to Unilever.
Entrepreneurs

How a Great Idea and Just $500 Launched a Powerful Network of Entrepreneurial Women of Color

Here's the story of how Aisha Taylor Issah founded Sistahs in Business Expo.

More from Entrepreneur

Get heaping discounts to books you love delivered straight to your inbox. We’ll feature a different book each week and share exclusive deals you won’t find anywhere else.
Jumpstart Your Business. Entrepreneur Insider is your all-access pass to the skills, experts, and network you need to get your business off the ground—or take it to the next level.
Create your business plan in half the time with twice the impact using Entrepreneur's BIZ PLANNING PLUS powered by LivePlan. Try risk free for 60 days.

Latest on Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur Media, Inc. values your privacy. In order to understand how people use our site generally, and to create more valuable experiences for you, we may collect data about your use of this site (both directly and through our partners). By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to the use of that data. For more information on our data policies, please visit our Privacy Policy.