Mobile Nation: Two-Thirds of Millennials Don't Have a Landline

A new government report shows that while four in 10 adults live in homes with only a wireless telephone, that number is much higher for younger adults.

learn more about Catherine Clifford

By Catherine Clifford • Jul 7, 2014 Originally published Jul 7, 2014

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Landlines are becoming relics of a bygone era.

About two-third of millennials live in a wireless-only house, according to the preliminary results of the National Health Interview Survey, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Among adults aged 25 to 29, 66 percent live in a house without a landline. Among the 30 to 34 age group, 60 percent live in a house without a landline, according to the survey.

Related: Mobile Technology for Business Owners On the Go

The percentage of millennials living in homes without landlines is higher than for adults in the U.S. overall. Nationwide, approximately two in five households (41 percent) live in a wireless-only household.

While the percentage of adults living without a landline continues to increase, the rate by which it is growing has slowed over the years. The number of wireless-only households rose 2.8 percent from 2012 to 2013, and 4.2 percent from 2011 to 2012. Five years ago, annual growth was 5.2 percent.

Related: More People Want to Get Shocked Than Sit in Total Stillness for 15 Minutes

The trends of wireless-only living also tend to correlate with home ownership. Of those adults living in rented homes, 62 percent had only wireless service. Among adults living in a home owned by a resident, only 29 percent lived in wireless-only homes.

In addition to whether an adult owns or rents his or her home, part of what could be affecting the growth rate in the number of adults living with landlines is cable connectivity. Many cable packages include a landline phone, and so many adults who have presumably been set up with Internet and television service are also getting -- or have already had -- a landline installed as part of the package.

Related: Supreme Court Unanimously Rules Police Can't Search Smartphones Without a Warrant

Catherine Clifford

Senior Entrepreneurship Writer at CNBC

Catherine Clifford is senior entrepreneurship writer at CNBC. She was formerly a senior writer at Entrepreneur.com, the small business reporter at CNNMoney and an assistant in the New York bureau for CNN. Clifford attended Columbia University where she earned a bachelor's degree. She lives in Brooklyn, N.Y. You can follow her on Twitter at @CatClifford.

Related Topics

Editor's Pick

This Co-Founder Was Kicked Out of Retailers for Pitching a 'Taboo' Beauty Product. Now, Her Multi-Million-Dollar Company Sells It for More Than $20 an Ounce.
Have You Ever Obsessed Over 'What If'? According to Scientists, You Don't Actually Know What Would Have Fixed Everything.
Most People Don't Know These 2 Things Are Resume Red Flags. A Career Expert Reveals How to Work Around Them.
Starting a Business

5 Ways to Expand Your Pet Sitting and Dog Walking Business

The new book, Start Your Own Pet Business, details easy ways to add new revenue streams to your biz.

Thought Leaders

5 Small Daily Habits Self-Made Millionaires Use to Grow Their Wealth

We've all seen what self-made millionaires look like on TV, but it's a lot more subtle than that. Brian Tracy researched what small daily habits these successful entrepreneurs adopted on their journey from rags to riches.

Business News

Massive Fire At Top Egg Farm Leaves Estimated 100,000 Hens Dead. What Does This Mean For Egg Prices?

Hillandale Farms in Bozrah, Connecticut went up in flames on Saturday in an incident that is still under investigation.

Business Ideas

55 Small Business Ideas To Start Right Now

To start one of these home-based businesses, you don't need a lot of funding -- just energy, passion and the drive to succeed.

Business News

Survey: A Majority of Americans Are Living Paycheck to Paycheck

Sixty-four percent of U.S. consumers live paycheck to paycheck — even those who earn more than $100,000 a year.