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How to Know If You Need to Patent Your Product

You are ready to introduce your invention to the world, but first you should consider whether your new product requires a patent to help make it commercially viable.

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By Christopher Hann • May 5, 2013 Originally published May 5, 2013

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Q: I'm ready to step out of my basement workshop and introduce my invention to the world. Do I really need to get a patent first?

A: You've designed a better mousetrap. And you're anxious to get the production and sales processes snapping so you can sooner start counting your profits. Not so fast. You might first want to think about applying for a patent.

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