My Queue

There are no Videos in your queue.

Click on the Add to next to any video to save to your queue.

There are no Articles in your queue.

Click on the Add to next to any article to save to your queue.

There are no Podcasts in your queue.

Click on the Add to next to any podcast episode to save to your queue.

You're not following any authors.

Click the Follow button on any author page to keep up with the latest content from your favorite authors.

Ready For Anything

How to Address Gender Inequity at Work

Acknowledging gender inequity is the first step. Here is an action plan for what to do next.
How to Address Gender Inequity at Work
Image credit: Portra | Getty Images
Content Provider
3 min read
This story originally appeared on Ellevate

If you have even a remote sense that there is gender inequity playing out at work -- whether you’ve heard unofficial comments or observed something more blatant -- it is critical to step up and address the situation head on. Here is an action plan for what to do:

1. Acknowledge there is a potential issue and there is a plan to look into it. Making people feel heard is hugely validating and will build trust and allegiance.

Related: Shifting the Paradigm to Embrace Gender Differences

2. Do an objective assessment of the situation across levels, departments, locations, men and women. Use an outside expert to create a confidential setting for sharing perspectives and analyze data. Surveys, one-on-one interviews, exit interviews, off-line feedback from alumni and review of hiring, promotion, pay and turnover data are all important to incorporate.

3. Report out on findings and why they matter. Highlight how this impacts the business as well as the individuals, including alignment with the company mission, core values and performance targets. Leverage industry and competitive data to show where there is a deviation from leading practices.

4. Set up support. Steps 1-3 will get people talking more and they need a place to share and be heard -- and the company needs to keep listening. Small group discussions, peer level discussions and 1:1s with managers and leaders are really important here. Keep the conversation going.

5. Develop a detailed action plan to address operational, cultural and individual changes with specific steps, timing, owners, KPIs and accountability by leadership. Outline who is on the hook for achieving change and how success will be measured and stick to it. Be specific about what the future will look like. Communicate widely on all of this to rally the company around a common vision.

Related: One Thing You Can Do to Be a Great Supporter of Women at Work

6. Establish ongoing, regular measurements against goals, reviews of issues and new findings, and read-outs on progress to date. Ensure this work stays a consistent priority and does not get buried under everyone’s other day job commitments.

7. As initial goals begin to be achieved, establish a continuous improvement process so new feedback and learnings continue to be incorporated into the new cultural and operational norms. This is the icing on the cake that will help employees and shareholders see there is true long-term commitment to change. The payback is tremendous here.

We have seen time and time again that gender inequity does not work itself out. It is like a splinter that is not removed right away. It festers and spreads infection. Getting to the root of any gender-based issues is critical to make employees feel safe, engaged and valued, all of which translates to driving the best results possible for the company.

(By Michelle Bogan. Bogan is a founder and CEO, women's leadership advisor and speaker.)

More From Women Entrepreneur

Ready For Anything

Designer Nicole Miller Shares How She's Learned to Embrace Social Media, Influencers -- and the Need for Resiliency

Miller never saw herself as a 'woman' entrepreneur but recognizes that 'Somehow, the men get touted more than we do.'
Artificial Intelligence

There's a Massive Gender Gap in AI, but Tech Education Programs for Young Girls Aim to Close It

Iridescent, a tech education nonprofit, teaches women and girls about AI, tech entrepreneurship and more. So far, it's trained more than 114,000 people from 115 countries.
breastfeeding

How I Got My Employer to Acknowledge My Nursing Issue

Did you know there's a federal law mandating accommodations in the workplace for working moms?
Growth

How This Entrepreneur Learned to Find Feedback in Every Rejection

Polly Rodriguez's success didn't just happen overnight -- she has been building her business for years now.

More from Entrepreneur

Michael Peggs expertise in SEO, PPC and paid social advertising can help you step up your marketing and advertising game.
In as little as seven months, the Entrepreneur Authors program will turn your ideas and expertise into a professionally presented book.
Create your business plan in half the time with twice the impact using Entrepreneur's BIZ PLANNING PLUS powered by LivePlan. Try risk free for 60 days.

Latest on Entrepreneur