Subscribe to Entrepreneur for $5
Subscribe

Domino's Will Pay You to Not Get Your Pizza Delivered

Customers must meet the minimum purchase amount of $5 before tax and gratuity to take advantage of the deal, which can be combined with another carryout offer for extra savings.

By

As the Great Resignation continues to squeeze the labor pool and supply-chain issues drive costs ever higher, companies are forced to come up with creative ways to snag more customers without overextending themselves.

Domino's Pizza is one of the latest businesses thinking outside of the box. On Monday, the world's largest pizza chain released a statement introducing its new "Carryout Tips" policy, which pays $3 to customers who pick up their orders instead of having them delivered; the "tip" can then be used on their next online takeout order.

"It takes skill to get pizza from a Domino's store to your door," said Domino's executive vice president and chief marketing officer Art D'Elia. "As a reward, Domino's is giving a $3 tip to online carryout customers who take the time and energy out of their day to act as their own delivery drivers. After all, we think they deserve it."

Related: Domino's Is Randomly Surprising Customers With $50 Million of Free Food: 'It's My Lucky Day'

Now through May 22, customers who place their orders online will receive the $3 credit, which can be redeemed for another online carryout order the following week. Customers must meet the minimum purchase amount of $5 before tax and gratuity to take advantage of the deal, which can be combined with another carryout offer for extra savings.

The chain made headlines earlier this month after word spread that the number of wings in its $7.99 carryout offer would drop from 10 pieces to just eight in response to increasing food and labor costs. Per CNN, Domino's CEO Richard Allison said that the chain anticipates "unprecedented increases" in food prices, with ingredient costs spiking 8% to 10% compared to last year.

Domino's newest carryout strategy comes at an ideal time ahead of Super Bowl Sunday — one of the chain's busiest days of the year, with about two million pizzas typically sold.

Related: 'The Great Resignation,' and the Future of the Workplace

Entrepreneur Editors' Picks