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U.S. Senator Seeks to Stop Loot Boxes in Video Games Like 'Fortnite'

'When a game is designed for kids, game developers shouldn't be allowed to monetize addiction,' said U.S. Senator Josh Hawley.

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This story originally appeared on PCMag

A U.S. senator wants to ban loot boxes in directed at children, claiming they can promote .

via PC Mag

On Wednesday, Senator Josh Hawley (R-Missouri) said he plans on introducing legislation cracking down on loot boxes and other "pay-to-win" mechanics, such as microtransactions that can unlock new content. His goal is to bar makers from ever using the practices on minors under the age of 18

"When a game is designed for kids, game developers shouldn't be allowed to monetize addiction," he said in a statement. "And when kids play games designed for adults, they should be walled off from compulsive microtransactions. Game developers who knowingly exploit children should face legal consequences."

Hawley talked up the coming legislation as governments across the world have been investigating whether loot boxes can be a form of gambling. The concept generally works like this: in exchange for some real money, you can buy a mystery box, which might contain a valuable in-game item or something entirely worthless.

Hawley claims loot boxes and other pay-to-win mechanics can needlessly force players to spend money to progress through the game. He also argues the same practices can spur addiction among children. " and video games prey on user addiction, siphoning our kids' attention from the real world and extracting profits from fostering compulsive habits," he added.

His upcoming legislation will call on the U.S.'s Federal Trade Commission to enforce the proposed rules. State attorneys would also be able to file lawsuits against video game makers that violate the ban.

In response to Hawley's threat of regulation, the video game trade group, the Entertainment Software Association, said that many other countries have found that loot boxes do not constitute a form of gambling.

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