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If You Buckle Under Stress, Avoid These 10 Jobs Dancers, childcare administrators and people who draw blood are some seriously stressed out folks, says a recent report. What other jobs made the cut?

By Carolyn Sun

entrepreneur daily

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

If you're not into high stakes situations with urgent deadlines -- or life-and-death thrown in your way -- steer clear of these 10 jobs that were rated as the highest stress jobs in the United States using a "stress tolerance" score between 1 and 100 from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), a U.S. Department of Labor database, reports Business Insider.

The stress tolerance score is a measure of the level of criticism a worker must endure on the job and how effectively a worker must deal with stress. (A score of 100 is the highest need for stress tolerance.)

Interestingly enough, six out of the 10 jobs are in medicine and health care.

Related: How Successful People Deal With Stress

Check out the above video to see the jobs that made the cut.

Carolyn Sun is a freelance writer for Entrepreneur.com. Find out more on Twitter and Facebook

 

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