FDA

FDA Bans Some Cilantro Imports After Finding Feces and Toilet Paper in Fields

FDA Bans Some Cilantro Imports After Finding Feces and Toilet Paper in Fields
Image credit: Pixabay

Here's something that might make you put down your burrito.

On Monday, the FDA announced the partial ban of fresh cilantro imported from farms in Puebla, Mexico. The reason: farms in the region were found to lack running water and toilet facilities, with the FDA and health authorities discovering toilet paper and feces in fields.

The FDA's investigation of Puebla's cilantro farming practices began after cilantro imported from the area was linked to annually recurring outbreaks of cyclosporiasis in 2013 and 2014, as well as potentially 2012. Cyclosposiasis is an intestinal illness, most commonly caused by eating or drinking a food or beverage contaminated with feces.

Related: The Secret Menu Items at Your Favorite Restaurant Chains

The ban will affect select shipments of fresh cilantro shipments from April to August of every year.

Mexican companies selling cilantro that may be from Puebla must prove to health authorities that they have taken appropriate safety and health measures if they wish to export products to the U.S.  

Related: 15 Absurdly Wonderful Bacon-Flavored Products

Edition: December 2016

Get the Magazine

Limited-Time Offer: 1 Year Print + Digital Edition and 2 Gifts only $9.99
Subscribe Now