Say What?

Must-know definitions of the latest Web jargon
This story appears in the July 2000 issue of Startups. Subscribe »
Reader Resource

Position yourself for growth in 2017—join us live at the Entrepreneur 360.
Flash Sale—save up to $200 on registration. Ends Thursday. Secure Your Seat »

Ah, jargon. The mainstay of netheads (is that considered jargon?) everywhere. The staple of the tech-inclined searching for yet another way to say "techno geek." The bane of every editor's existence. Like it or not, jargon is HTS (here to stay). Add some new terms to your jargon repertoire-hey, IYCBEJE. (If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.)

Moved to atlanta. Describes a page that's resulted in the dreaded "404: page not found" error.

Dog food. For software developers: to actually use the software you develop.

Javant-garde. A loosely defined set of beliefs assuming that "new media" is somehow cooler or more creative than "old media."

Netopath. The most extreme and deranged form of Net abuser.

Reverse egosurfing. Feeding your name to search engines to see how widely your fame, or infamy, has spread on the Net.

Laganoia. The fear, engendered by network lag, of being ignored. It's triggered by many situations, including delayed e-mail replies.

Internesia. The growing tendency to forget exactly where in cyberspace you saw a bit of info.

Source: KeithDawson, aka Jargon Scout (

Edition: October 2016

Get the Magazine

Limited-Time Offer: 1 Year Print + Digital Edition and 2 Gifts only $9.99
Subscribe Now