That Time Jeff Bezos Was the Stupidest Person in the Room Everyone can benefit from simple advice, no matter who they are.

By Gene Marks

entrepreneur daily

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Alex Wong | Getty Images

When you think of Jeff Bezos, a lot of things probably come to your mind.

You likely think of Amazon.com, a company he founded more than twenty years ago, that's completely disrupted retail and online commerce as we know it. You probably also think of his entrepreneurial genius. Or the immense wealth that he's built for himself and others. You may also think of drones, Alexa and same-day delivery. Bezos is a visionary, an entrepreneur, a cutthroat competitor and a game changer. He's unquestionably a very, very smart man. But sometimes, he can be…well…stupid, too.

Related: 5 Lessons from Jeff Bezos's 21 Years of Shareholder Letters

Like that time back in 1995.

That was when Amazon was just a startup operating from a 2,000 square foot basement in Seattle. During that period, Bezos and most of the handful of employees working for him had other day jobs. They gathered in the office after hours to print and pack up the orders that their fast-growing bookselling site was receiving each day from around the world. It was tough, grueling work.

The company at the time, according to a speech Bezos gave, had no real organization or distribution. Worse yet, the process of filling orders was physically demanding.

Related: Why Being the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Essential Goal

"We were packing on our hands and knees on a hard concrete floor," Bezos recalled. "I said to the person next to me 'this packing is killing me! My back hurts, it's killing my knees' and the person said 'yeah, I know what you mean.'"

Bezos, our hero, the entrepreneurial genius, the CEO of a now 600,000-employee company that's worth around a trillion dollars and one of the richest men in the world today then came up with what he thought was a brilliant idea. "You know what we need," he said to the employee as they packed boxes together. "What we need is...kneepads!"

The employee (Nicholas Lovejoy, who worked at Amazon for three years before founding his own philanthropic organization financed by the millions he made from the company's stock) looked at Bezos like he was -- in Bezos' words -- the "stupidest guy in the room."

"What we need, Jeff," Lovejoy said, "are a few packing tables." Duh.

So the next day Bezos -- after acknowledging Lovejoy's brilliance -- bought a few inexpensive packing tables. The result? An almost immediate doubling in productivity. In his speech, Bezos said that the story is just one of many examples how Amazon built its customer-centered service culture from the company's very early days. Perhaps that's true. Then again, it could mean something else.

Related: 4 Ways to Get Truly Honest Feedback From Employees

It could mean that sometimes, just sometimes, those successful, smart, wealthy and powerful people may not be as brilliant as you may think. Nor do they always have the right answers. Sometimes, just sometimes, they may actually be the stupidest guy in the room. So keep that in mind the next time you're doing business with an intimidating customer, supplier or partner who appears to know it all. You might be the one with the brilliant idea.

Gene Marks

Entrepreneur Leadership Network® VIP

President of The Marks Group

Gene Marks is a CPA and owner of The Marks Group PC, a ten-person technology and financial consulting firm located near Philadelphia founded in 1994.

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

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