Oh, the Irony: Coke Slams Social Media Addicts in New Viral Video

Coca-Cola's solution for society's intensifying gadget addiction involves a cone collar that prevents you from fixating on your phone -- but not from drinking Coke.

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By Geoff Weiss • Feb 20, 2014

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Have we become so hooked on social media that the only feasible solution is corporal restraint?

That's what Coke is suggesting -- in a new viral marketing campaign, no less -- touting the launch of a faux new product it's calling The Social Media Guard.

The bright red, Elizabethan collar (most familiarly known as the cone of shame that is adorned by pets post-surgery) redirects the gaze of mobile addicts from their devices back to reality -- "Remember that?" taunts the ad. "It's the thing that happens when you run out of battery."

Related: Home-Brewed Coca-Cola in 2015 Could Transform the Beverage Industry

Though The Social Media Guard restricts range of motion, wearers are still thankfully able to guzzle bottles of soda, as the ad concludes, "Share a real moment with Coca-Cola."

Check it out here:

Related: Coca-Cola Splits in Effort to Focus on Franchising

Geoff Weiss

Former Staff Writer

Geoff Weiss is a former staff writer at Entrepreneur.com.

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