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Meet the Newest Member of Kickstarter's Million-Dollar Club This startup has entered an elite and growing group that has raised seven figures on the popular crowdfunding site.

By Catherine Clifford

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

If you still have the idea that crowdfunding is reserved territory for artists to raise a few hundred dollars to fund their next project, then you need to think again. On Kickstarter, 80 campaigns have raised more than $1 million.

The newest product to enter Kickstarter's million-dollar club is a sleep and bedroom condition tracker called Sense. The campaign for Sense ended today and raised $2.4 million, blowing way past its goal to raise $100,000. The device measures the temperature in your bedroom, sound, your movement and when you are in your deepest sleep rhythms, among other metrics.

Related: With $9 Million and Counting, This Cooler Could Become the No. 1 Kickstarter Campaign Ever

Developed by James Proud, a former Thiel Fellow, Sense is a three-part system: a spherical modern-looking holder which sits on your bedside table, a small button-looking piece that clips to your pillow, and a smartphone application.

While keeping your crowdfunding campaign's minimum requirement to get funded is generally a good rule of thumb, Sense's Kickstarter campaign ended up being 2,411 percent funded -- an impressive accomplishment. Proud's not alone in achieving four-digit percent funding rate stats, though. Here are a few recent examples.

The 3Doodler, a 3-D printing pen you can hold in your hand, raised $2.3 million on a $30,000 pledge goal. In other words, the 3-D printing pen was 7,814 percent funded.

Related: A Device to Help You Sleep Better Raises Almost $500K in Two Days on Kickstarter

The Coolest, a pimped out cooler that includes a blender, speakers for your music and a phone charger, has raised more than $9 million on a $50,000 pledge goal. That means The Coolest has already raised 18,362 percent of its goal. And The Coolest campaign still has a week to go.

Or check out the campaign for the 10-year Hoodie: When the men's underwear company Flint and Tinder launched a campaign to test its concept for a sweatshirt guaranteed to last a decade, the campaign pulled in 2,108 percent of its ask. Flint and Tinder founder Jake Bronstein raised more than a million dollars on his $50,000 goal.

Related: Kickstarter Wrote a Computer Program For Its 'Lunch Roulette.' And Now It's Sharing the Code.

Catherine Clifford

Frequently covers crowdfunding, the sharing economy and social entrepreneurship.

Catherine Clifford is a senior writer at Entrepreneur.com. Previously, she was the small business reporter at CNNMoney and an assistant in the New York bureau for CNN. Catherine attended Columbia University where she earned a bachelor's degree. She lives in Brooklyn, N.Y. Email her at CClifford@entrepreneur.com. You can follow her on Twitter at @CatClifford.

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